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Nutrition for Health

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Nutrition for Health

Nutrition is the cornerstone of a healthy lifestyle and any performance goal. There are large demand and expectation of various professionals to discuss nutrition with their clients. This course will encapsulate all facets of nutrition from the basics of healthy eating and motivating your clients to specialised nutrition for common issues in our society.

This qualification is suitable for people working in the leisure or care sectors and others who are in a position to promote healthy eating. It is also relevant to health and teaching professionals who might have a role in the promotion of healthy eating or the preparation of meals, menus and diets.

This qualification is on The Education and Skills Funding Agency list of qualifications approved for funding. This qualification is regulated by Ofqual and CCEA.

The qualification’s objective is to provide learners with the knowledge and understanding of a healthy balanced diet and how this can be applied to adjust diets/menus to align them with healthy eating guidelines, as well as how to deliver healthy eating messages, either through changes to food choices/diets/menus or broader health campaigns. It also covers the relationship between diet and health and wellbeing, including the role that other influences, such as internal and external triggers, may have on diet.

Upon completion of this qualification, learners will understand and apply healthy eating guidelines and/or information provided by nutrition professionals to the development of recipes and menus, in order to provide healthy balanced options to meet the needs of individuals or groups.

Unit Nutrition for Health

Guided Learning: 23 hours Total Unit Time: 30 hours
Unit Level: IRE Level 3
Unit reference number: Y/616/4349

Summary of Learning Outcomes:
To achieve this qualification a candidate must:

  1. Understand how to plan and promote healthier food choices, with reference to:
    1. 1.1  Key factors to consider when communicating healthy eating messages
    2. 1.2  Examples of how healthy eating messages may be adapted for certainpopulations
    3. 1.3  Ways in which sources of reliable nutrition information are delivered
  2. Understand the internal and external factors that drive food choices, with reference to:
    1. 2.1  What a “trigger” is and how it may affect personal food choices
    2. 2.2  Examples of internal and external triggers and the impact they may have onfood choices
    3. 2.3  Ways in which an individual can use triggers to improve food choices
  3. Understand how to identify improvements within a specific diet or menu,with reference to:
    1. 3.1  Areas within a provided food diary where alternatives could be suggested to better comply with healthy eating guidelines
    2. 3.2  Areas within the average British diet where alternatives could be suggested to better comply with healthy eating guidelines
    3. 3.3  How factors (gender, age and culture) can influence acceptable alternatives in food choices
  4. Understand how to address specific health conditions by changing a diet or menu, with reference to:
    1. 4.1  Specific health conditions and the role nutrition plays in each.
    2. 4.2  How to adapt diets or meal plans for specific health conditions
    3. 4.3  The impact that cooking methods may have on health

Candidates successfully achieving this unit will have factual, procedural and theoretical knowledge and understanding of Nutrition specifically for Health to complete tasks that while well-defined, may be complex and non-routine. Candidates can interpret and evaluate relevant information and ideas, they are aware of the nature of Nutrition and the different perspectives or approaches within this area.

Content

1. Understand how to plan and promote healthier food choices

  1. 1.1  Key factors to consider when communicating healthy eating messages: factors that affect health literacy including language, education and cultural background and their influence on the way in which healthy eating messages are delivered; the role of communication channels such as online, face-to- face, text and posters.
  2. 1.2  Examples of how healthy eating messages may be adapted for certain populations:examples of how messages are adapted for people with low English literacy, children, elderly, and a mixed population such as the general public; how language, communication channels and messaging all need to be adjusted such as using pictures for children or simple language for people with low literacy.
  3. 1.3  Ways in which sources of reliable nutritional information are delivered:communication channels such as newsletters, posters, health campaigns (including online), group programmes and 1:1 delivery; examples such as Change4Life or 5-a-day; specific strengths and weaknesses of sources including cost, tailoring of message and reach.

2. Understand the internal and external triggers that drive food choices

  1. 2.1  What a “trigger” is and how it may affect personal food choices: the role that triggers play in when, where and why we eat; the difference between internal and external triggers and how each of these impact on food choices.
  2. 2.2  Examples of internal and external triggers and the impact they may have on food choices: internal triggers such as emotions, hunger/fullness signals, and stress; external triggers such as who you are with (peers), where food is consumed (home, at table, in front of TV), what food is available, advertising and sensory stimuli; how some triggers, such as fruit bowls and hunger/fullness signals, encourage healthier eating and how others, such as stress or advertising, can often lead to unhealthy habits.
  3. 2.3  Ways in which an individual can use triggers to improve food choices: how adjustments to common triggers such as above (2.2) as well as appetite, advertising and product promotion both within the home and food service environment, can improve, instead of impair, food choices.

3. Understand how to identify improvements within a specific diet or menu

  1. 3.1  Areas within a provided food diary where alternatives could be suggested to better comply with healthy eating guidelines: comparison of a 3-day food journal with healthy eating guidelines such as Eatwell Guide and 5-a- day; areas where guidelines are not being met and alternatives (e.g. food choices, cooking techniques) to increase compliance.
  2. 3.2  Identifying areas within the average British diet where alternatives could be suggested to better comply with healthy eating guidelines: comparison of the average British diet with healthy eating guidelines such as Eatwell Guide and 5-a- day; alternative food choices and cooking techniques to improve compliance with guidelines.
  3. 3.3  Factors (gender, age and culture) that can influence acceptable alternatives in food choices: how age influences alternative food choices such as older people (60+) consuming less and choosing different foods, eating less energy dense foods and eating more grains, whilst 18-30 yr olds focus on food preparation, price and time; how gender influences alternatives such as females are more likely to focus on how food will affect their looks/image, also more concerned about health than males who tend to see traditional foods as healthy eating and who focus on taste and habit; females more likely to be affected by mood and food choices; how culture influences the habitual consumption of specific foods and preparation methods, as well as restrictions on food and how culture (moving to another country) can bring changes to the host country e.g. curry is now more popular than fish and chips in UK.

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4. Understand how to address specific health conditions by changing a diet or menu

  1. 4.1  Identifying specific health conditions and the role nutrition plays in each: health conditions such as heart health, diabetes, obesity and hypertension; how nutrition and diet affects each condition.
  2. 4.2  How to adapt diets or meal plans for specific health conditions: improvements or substitutions such as reducing salt, butter, cream, cheese; using herbs and spices; using lean meat; increasing fruit and vegetables, pulses and wholegrain options; alternative cooking methods such as baking instead of frying; how these make meal plans or diets better comply with dietary guidelines around heart health, diabetes, obesity, hypertension and allergens.
  3. 4.3  Impact that cooking methods may have on health: cooking methods such as grilling, boiling, steaming, microwaving, frying (deep and shallow) and baking; impact each cooking method may have upon health and how this could be improved.

Assessment

The knowledge and understanding of the candidates will be assessed by a multiple- choice examination. The multiple-choice examination is provided by RSPH. The multiple-choice test consists of 40 questions and is of 120 minutes duration. A candidate who is able to satisfy the learning outcomes will achieve a score of at least 26 out of 40 in the examination. Strong performance in some areas of the qualification content may compensate for poorer performance in other areas.

Progression

Learners who achieve this qualification can progress to the following qualifications:

  • CIMSPA Level 3 Fitness Instructor
  • CIMSPA Level 4 Personal Training
  • RSPH Level 5 Nutrition for Physical Activity and SportCentre Guidance Recommended prior learning

    It is recommended that candidates already possess a Level 2 Award in Nutrition, or equivalent qualification, before studying for the Level 3 Award.

    Useful Websites

    • Association for Nutrition: http://www.associationfornutrition.org/
    • Change4Life:https://www.nhs.uk/change4life-beta
    • Eat well Guide: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/the-eatwell- guide
    • NHS Choices Healthy Eating:http://www.nhs.uk/livewell/healthy-eating/Pages/Healthyeating.aspx
    • NHS Choices Food Labels:http://www.nhs.uk/Livewell/Goodfood/Pages/food-labelling.aspx
    • British Dietetic Association: https://www.bda.uk.com/
    • Weight wise:http://www.bdaweightwise.com/
    • British Nutrition Foundation: https://www.nutrition.org.uk/
    • National Diet and Nutrition Survey: https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/national-diet-and- nutrition- survey
    • Food Labelling and Packaging: https://www.gov.uk/food- labelling-and- packaging/overview
    • Food Standards Agency: http://www.food.gov.uk

Mapping to National Occupational Standards

This qualification maps to the following National Occupational Standard developed by Improve:

IMPFT102K Principles of Human Food Nutrition

Further details of this National Occupational Standard can be obtained from RSPH Qualifications.

Mapping to Public Health Skills and Knowledge Framework

This qualification maps to the following functions of the Public Health Knowledge and Skills Framework (PHSKF):

A1.2 Interpret and present data and information

A2.6 Facilitate change (behavioural and/or cultural) in organisations, communities and/or individuals

B2.5 Connect communities, groups and individuals to local resources and services that support their health and wellbeing

C2.2 Communicate sometimes complex information and concepts (including health outcomes, inequalities and life expectancy) to a diversity of audiences using different methods

C2.3 Facilitate dialogue with groups and communities to improve health literacy and reduce inequalities using a range of tools and technologies.